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Injuries - Statistics in Niagara

Every 10 minutes, someone from Niagara visits an emergency department because of an injury. Injuries include all the ways people can be physically hurt, impaired or killed. Injuries can be intentional or unintentional.

  • Unintentional injuries are accidental and include injuries from motor vehicle collisions, falls and sports
  • Intentional injuries happen when someone tries to physically hurt themselves (self-harm) or someone else (assault)

Some injuries can be minor, while others are severe enough to have to go to the emergency department. Sometimes, an injury can be so severe that it can result in death.

Overall, unintentional injuries are seen more often in the emergency department than intentional injuries. In 2016, there were 53,433 emergency department visits for unintentional injuries, with seven percent of these admitted to the hospital. In addition, there were 1,953 emergency department visits for intentional injuries, with 26 percent of these admitted to the hospital.

In Niagara, falls are the number one cause of injuries for children 0-9 years old, as well as adults 25 years and older. For youth aged 10-24, being struck by an object or struck against an object is the leading cause of injuries. This includes sports-related injuries, some of which result in concussions.

This section contains incidence data for Niagara related to select injuries.

FallsTop of Page

In Niagara, falls are the leading cause of injury-related emergency department visits, hospital admissions, and deaths. In 2016, there were 18,400 emergency department visits and 2,290 admissions to hospital.

Since 2009, emergency department visits due to falls have increased significantly. Currently, Niagara has a significantly higher rate of emergency department visits due to falls when compared to Ontario.

In 2012 (most recent year of death data), 125 people died from injuries related to falling. The majority of deaths were in adults 75 years and older.

Emergency department visits related to falls

Source: Ambulatory Emergency External Cause [2009-2016], Ontario Ministry of Health and Long-Term Care, IntelliHealth Ontario, Date extracted: January 9, 2018. Population Estimates [2009-2016], Ontario Ministry of Health and Long-Term Care, IntelliHealth Ontario, Date extracted: January 9, 2018.

Emergency department visits related to falls, by age (2014-2016)

Source: Ambulatory Emergency External Cause [2014-2016], Ontario Ministry of Health and Long-Term Care, IntelliHealth Ontario, Date extracted: January 9, 2018. Population Estimates [2014-2016], Ontario Ministry of Health and Long-Term Care, IntelliHealth Ontario, Date extracted: January 9, 2018.

AssaultTop of Page

In 2016, there were 1,137 emergency department visits and 70 hospitalizations related to assault. Males visit the emergency department and are hospitalized more often than females for assault.

From 2009 to 2016, the rate of emergency department visits for assault has declined significantly; however, Niagara's emergency department visit rates are still higher than the province. During this time, hospital admission rates have not changed significantly.

Emergency department visits for assaults are highest among males ages 15-29 year olds (2014-2016). The rate of emergency department visits steadily decreases after that age.

Deaths from assault are too low to report on.

Emergency department visits related to assault

Source: Ambulatory Emergency External Cause [2009-2016], Ontario Ministry of Health and Long-Term Care, IntelliHealth Ontario, Date extracted: January 9, 2018. Population Estimates [2009-2016], Ontario Ministry of Health and Long-Term Care, IntelliHealth Ontario, Date extracted: January 9, 2018.

Emergency department visits related to assault, by age (2014-2016)

Source: Ambulatory Emergency External Cause [2014-2016], Ontario Ministry of Health and Long-Term Care, IntelliHealth Ontario, Date extracted: January 9, 2018. Population Estimates [2014-2016], Ontario Ministry of Health and Long-Term Care, IntelliHealth Ontario, Date extracted: January 9, 2018.

Motor Vehicle CollisionsTop of Page

Motor vehicle collisions can happen for many reasons, including distracted driving, speeding and drunk driving.

In 2015, 31 per cent of Niagara drivers have used their phone or mobile device while driving. In addition, 43 per cent of Niagara students who have their licence have texted while driving. Four percent of Niagara students who have their licence have driven within an hour of having two or more drinks and 10 per cent of Niagara students who have their licence have driven within an hour of using marijuana or hashish.

In 2016, there were 3,257 emergency department visits and 315 hospital admissions due to motor vehicle collisions. Males are hospitalized more often than females.

In Niagara, motor vehicle collisions have higher rates of emergency department visits and admissions than the provincial average. Emergency department visits due to motor vehicle collision injuries are highest in those who are 15-29 years of age (2014-2016).

In 2012 (most recent year of death data), 27 people died from injuries related to motor vehicle collisions. The majority of deaths were in adults 20-39.

Emergency department visits related to motor vehicle collisions

Source: Ambulatory Emergency External Cause [2009-2016], Ontario Ministry of Health and Long-Term Care, IntelliHealth Ontario, Date extracted: January 9, 2018. Population Estimates [2014-2016], Ontario Ministry of Health and Long-Term Care, IntelliHealth Ontario, Date extracted: January 9, 2018.

Emergency department visits related to motor vehicle collision, by age (2014-2016)

Source: Ambulatory Emergency External Cause [2014-2016], Ontario Ministry of Health and Long-Term Care, IntelliHealth Ontario, Date extracted: January 9, 2018. Population Estimates [2014-2016], Ontario Ministry of Health and Long-Term Care, IntelliHealth Ontario, Date extracted: January 9, 2018.

Self-harmTop of Page

In 2016, self-harm injuries were the second leading cause of injury-related hospitalizations and injury-related deaths. In Niagara, there were 814 emergency department visits and 444 hospital admissions related to self-harm.

Since 2009, emergency department visits related to self-harm have increased significantly. Over half of all emergency department visits for self-harm (55 per cent) are admitted to hospital. Niagara has higher emergency department visits rates than the province.

Since 2009, females have had significantly higher rates of both emergency department visits and hospital admissions compared to males. Youth (15 to 24 years) have the highest rate of emergency department visits for self-harm injuries. In 2012 (most recent year of death data), 41 people died from self-harm-related injuries.

Emergency department visits related to self-harm

Source: Ambulatory Emergency External Cause [2009-2016], Ontario Ministry of Health and Long-Term Care, IntelliHealth Ontario, Date extracted: January 9, 2018. Population Estimates [2009-2016], Ontario Ministry of Health and Long-Term Care, IntelliHealth Ontario, Date extracted: January 9, 2018.

Emergency department visits related to self-harm, by age (2014-2016)

Source: Ambulatory Emergency External Cause [2014-2016], Ontario Ministry of Health and Long-Term Care, IntelliHealth Ontario, Date extracted: January 9, 2018. Population Estimates [2014-2016], Ontario Ministry of Health and Long-Term Care, IntelliHealth Ontario, Date extracted: January 9, 2018.

Concussions and Head InjuriesTop of Page

In 2016, there were 930 emergency department visits and 21 hospitalizations for injuries that resulted in a concussion (main diagnosis). Since 2009, emergency department visits for concussions have increased significantly.

The most common reason for a concussion is falling. When the concussion is sports-related, the most common sport being played when the concussion occurred is hockey.

Emergency department visits with a main diagnosis as a concussion

Source: Ambulatory Emergency External Cause [2009-2016], Ontario Ministry of Health and Long-Term Care, IntelliHealth Ontario, Date extracted: January 9, 2018. Population Estimates [2009-2016], Ontario Ministry of Health and Long-Term Care, IntelliHealth Ontario, Date extracted: January 9, 2018.

Emergency department visits with a main diagnosis as a concussion, by age (2014-2016)

Source: Ambulatory Emergency External Cause [2014-2016], Ontario Ministry of Health and Long-Term Care, IntelliHealth Ontario, Date extracted: January 9, 2018. Population Estimates [2014-2016], Ontario Ministry of Health and Long-Term Care, IntelliHealth Ontario, Date extracted: January 9, 2018.

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