Human Immunodeficiency Virus - Statistics and Incidence Rate

Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) is a virus that causes acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS). When you have this virus, your body has trouble fighting off other infections. It usually takes years before the virus develops into acquired immune deficiency syndrome.

This virus can be transmitted through blood, semen, vaginal fluid or breast milk. It can also be passed on from mother-to-child during childbirth or breastfeeding, by sharing needles or other drug use equipment, and by sharing razors or toothbrushes with blood on them. This virus is not curable.

Most people with this virus will not have any signs or symptoms for many years. The virus can be passed on to other people during this time. One common symptom is developing a mild flu 2 - 4 weeks after becoming infected.

HIV / AIDS in Niagara

  • 10 cases of HIV and less than five cases of AIDS were reported up to the end of September.
  • From 2007 to 2013 Niagara was below the provincial incidence rate for HIV (Figure 1)
  • Niagara was below or similar to the provincial incidence rate for AIDS from 2006 to 2009 (Figure 2). However, the Niagara incidence rate for AIDS was above the provincial rate from 2010 to 2013 (Figure 2).

Figure 1. Incidence rate of HIV by year, for Niagara region and Ontario (2006-2014).

Sources: Integrated Public Health Information System [2006-2015], extracted July 17, 2015; Population Estimates, IntelliHealth, Ministry of Health and Long-Term Care [2015], extracted April 17, 2015.

Ontario data: Ontario Ministry of Health and Long-Term Care, Integrated Public Health System database, extracted by Public Health Ontario [April 20, 2015].

Figure 2. Incidence rate of AIDS by year, for Niagara region and Ontario (2006-2014).

Sources: Integrated Public Health Information System [2006-2015], extracted July 17, 2015; Population Estimates, IntelliHealth, Ministry of Health and Long-Term Care [2015], extracted April 17, 2015.

Ontario data: Ontario Ministry of Health and Long-Term Care, Integrated Public Health System database, extracted by Public Health Ontario [April 20, 2015].

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