Cancer - Statistics in Niagara

Mortality

Source: Cancer Care Ontario-SEER *Stat Release 7 - OCRIS (February 2009) released March 2009

From 2000 to 2007, there were 9,016 cancer-related deaths in the Niagara region. Over one-quarter (25.2%) of these deaths were due to lung cancer. Colorectal, female breast, and prostate cancer collectively equate to more than one-quarter of these cancer-related deaths.

Just under half of all cancer-related deaths were attributable to various other cancers. Among these cancers, the highest numbers of deaths were due to cancers of the digestive system (other than colorectal), cancers of the urinary system, cancers of the female genital system, lymphoma, and leukemia.

Incidence

Source: Cancer Care Ontario-SEER *Stat Release 7 - OCRIS (February 2009) released March 2009

From 2000 to 2007, there were 19,511 newly diagnosed cases of cancer in the Niagara region. The cancers with the highest incidence for this time period include; prostate (16.1%), lung (14.5%), colorectal (12.7%), and female breast (12.7%). Just under half (44.0%) of the cancer incidence for this time period was attributable to various other types of cancers.

Within these 'other cancers', the highest incidence occurred among cancers of the urinary system, cancers of the female genital system, lymphomas, skin cancer (excluding basal cell and squamous cell carcinomas), and leukemia.

Cancer-specific Incidence and Mortality Rates

Colorectal cancer, lung cancer and female breast cancer remained relatively stable from 2000 to 2007. Colorectal cancer showed a slight increase in incidence, although not a statistically significant increase. Prostate cancer did increase during this time period, with a spike in incidence from 2004 to 2006. This may be due to increased screening during that time period. Since this increase is only seen over two years, however, it is difficult to determine if this is a pattern that will continue.

Cancer-specific Incidence Rates

Source: Cancer Care Ontario-SEER *Stat Release 7 - OCRIS (February 2009) released March 2009

The mortality rates for colorectal cancer, female breast cancer and prostate cancer have also remained relatively stable during the same time period. The mortality rate for lung cancer does appear to be increasing, but this increase is not statistically significant. Further data are required to determine if a trend exists.

Cancer-specific Mortality Rates

Source: Cancer Care Ontario-SEER *Stat Release 7 - OCRIS (February 2009) released March 2009
Page Feedback Did you find what you were looking for today?