Teaching Tool - Vaping

This presentation is for students to identify existing knowledge about electronic cigarettes, and identify protective and risk factors in order to implement resiliency and refusal skills.

Target audience: Students in Grades 9-12
Length of core content presentation: Varies on activity
Materials needed: Listed with each activity

Criteria Met

Grade Ontario Curriculum Codes
9 Health and Physical Education (2019) C1.3, C3.4
10 Health and Physical Education (2019) C1.2, C2.4
11 Health and Physical Education (2019) C2.2, C3.3
12 Health and Physical Education (2019) C1.2, C2.3

Goals

In facilitating this lesson, the teacher will:

  • Explain the components of electronic cigarettes and their appeal to youth
  • Describe the risks of using electronic cigarettes
  • Teach students appropriate resiliency and refusal skills

Objectives

By the end of this lesson, students will:

  • Gain a clear understanding of what electronic cigarettes are and how they work
  • Describe the risks of using electronic cigarettes
  • Describe ways to implement resiliency and refusal skills during difficult situations

Core Knowledge Content

Core knowledge content provides the teacher with the background information needed to prepare and teach this health class.

Learning Activities

  • Vaping (essential)

    Materials

    Instructions

    • Cue PowerPoint presentation on SMART board
    • Deliver presentation to students using notes embedded in presentation
    • Pause periodically throughout presentation, asking questions to assess comprehension and engage students in discussion
  • Deconstructing Advertisement Activity

    Time: 60 minutes

    Materials

    Instructions

    • Watch the How Juul Made Nicotine Go Viral video then ask the discussion questions below
      • Companies spend a lot of money figuring out how to get the attention of the people who they would like to buy their product. E-cigarette companies are no different. In 2014, e-cigarettes or vape pen advertising totalled $88.1 million. Why do you think companies are willing to spend so much on advertising?
      • Let's imagine there is a new law and advertisers for e-cigarettes have to be 100 per cent honest about their product, including what they do and don't know. How might the ads be different?
    • Then in partners or groups of 3, have the students find a vaping advertisement online that they like
    • Students will be looking at how the ad is made, and how it created to twist the truth and change your mind about purchasing or using the product
    • Each group will then complete the Deconstructing Advertisements Worksheet that will identify key features of the selected advertisement
    • Groups will then use their worksheet to rewrite or design their own "honest" version of the advertisement using proper slogans, imagery and text. They will create their advertisements on poster paper using marker, pencil crayons, etc.
    • Once each group is finished, review the original advertisement the group chose as a class and then compare it to the one they created. Identify positive key features of each new advertisement
    • Students can then hang the posters around the school in high volume areas to help prevent the use of e-cigarettes and or vapes to their peers

    Variations

    • Watch the Electronic Cigarettes and Vaping video then ask the discussion questions below
      • What stood out to you?
      • Was there anything that you did not know?
    • Then, using their devices, students will visit the Consider the Consequences link
    • Students will read the information on the Hidden Dangers page and complete the Spot the Hidden Words challenge on the website
  • Giant Jenga

    Time: 30 to 50 minutes

    Materials

    • Giant Jenga Game (contact your school's public health nurse for this item)
    • Giant Jenga Question Worksheet
    • Mini white boards or blank sheets of paper
    • Stopwatch or timer

    Instructions

    • Using the Giant Jenga game, one at a time, students will remove a block from the tower and flip it over to determine their question
    • Each coloured block has their own theme of questions
      • Blue = health concerns
      • Green = quick facts
      • Orange = device dangers
      • Pink = social trends and refusal skills
    • The teacher will read the corresponding question to the student from the Giant Jenga Question Worksheet. Answers are also found on this worksheet
    • Once the question has been answered, the student will then place the block they chose on the top of the tower
    • The next student can then select a block. The game continues until the tower falls over
    • Add on: have the students use the additional instructions found in the Jenga bag

    Variations

    • Have the students work in small groups to complete this game
    • Taking turns, one member from each group will select a block from the tower and will read it out loud to the class
    • On the teachers signal, groups will have 30 seconds to write their answers on the mini white boards or blank sheets of paper
    • Once the timer is complete, each group will hold up their answers to the question
    • If a group gets an answer correct, they will receive 5 points. If a group gets an answer partially correct, they will get 2.5 points
    • The group with the most points before the tower falls will win the game
  • Mystery Box Activity

    Time: 50 minutes

    Materials

    • Measuring wheel or meter stick
    • Multiple rolls of masking tape
    • Large cardboard box
    • Two transparent containers
    • Option 1 Mixture
      • Water
      • Food colouring
      • Liquid soap
      • Sand
      • Staples
      • Glitter
    • Option 2 Mixture
      • Water
      • Food colouring
      • Dish soap
      • Pencil lead
      • Paint
      • Liquid glue
      • Paperclips
      • Gold leafs

    Instructions

    • Get a large cardboard box and cut out one hole that is large enough to fit a hand through one side of the box
    • Use felt to create flaps to cover the openings to prevent people from looking into the box
    • Acquire two sleek transparent containers (ex: water bottle, pasta sauce jar) and prepare Option 1 and Option 2 mixtures to place inside the cardboard box
    • Once complete, ask students if they are willing to place their hand(s) in the box and feel the object inside
    • While they are feeling the object, ask them:
      • Describe how the products feel (ex: texture)
      • How would you describe its shape?
      • What do you think the object is?
      • Are you curious about what the product is?
      • Without knowing what the product is, would you want it? Or would you use it?
    • If they say yes: Reveal the bottle and state, "This is what you decided to use"
    • If they say no: Reveal the bottle and state, "This is what you would have risked using"
    • Explain the connection between choosing to use an e-cigarette based off its harmless appeal and lack of information on its content (ex: e-liquid)
    • Deliver the key messages:
      • Do not risk using something without knowing its content
      • The ingredients of e-liquids are unknown as there is a lack of quality control
      • The vapour produced by e-cigarettes contain toxic chemicals (ex: benzene), heavy metals (lead, nickel and tin) and tiny particles
    • Note: Do not allow students to open the bottle; and run the activity according to the amount of people present

    Variations

    Class Discussion

    • Do schools permit vaping on school property?
    • How many meters away from school property must someone be to vape?
      • Have students get into small groups of four or five
      • Using masking tape, groups will estimate how long they think 20 meters is and place the tape on the ground in the classroom or in the hallway
      • Once each group has estimated how long they think it is, use a measuring wheel or a meter stick to measure out how far 20 meters truly is
    • Were you surprised with how far 20 meters actually was?
    • Where do you think 20 meters is away from your school property?
    • Why do you think it is important to be this far away from school property?
  • Face the Facts about Vaping

    Time: 30 minutes

    Materials

    Instructions

    • Watch the Teens Talking About Vaping video
    • Class discussion
      • What were the main messages of the video?
      • What stood out to you?
      • Did anything surprise you?
    • Then, print and cut out the Vaping Health Effects Activity Cards, mix them up and give one to each student
    • Print a second copy of the activity cards to reference as an answer key
    • Without talking, students will have to find their matching card
    • *Each topic can have more than one definition card to match
    • Once students have found their matches, as a class review each of the activity cards and their associated definitions

    Discussion Questions

    • What did you notice about the theme of the activity cards?
    • Why do you think a theme of "Vaping Health Effects" was chosen?
    • Do you think it is important to learn about the health effects of vaping? Why or why not?
    • How can students spread the word about the dangerous health effects of vaping?

    Variations

    • Have students get into small groups of three or four and discuss the following:
      • Do you think that flavoured pods and e-juices should be banned? Why or why not?
      • What do you think would happen if the flavours of pods and e-juices were banned?
      • Who do you think this would affect most?
      • Would this be beneficial for students? Why or why not?
    • Groups will then create a social media post for Instagram or a Twitter post that outlines the negative implications of vaping and the use of different flavours of e-juice
  • Differing Abilities

    Time: 30 minutes

    Materials

    Instructions

    What is Nicotine?

    • Review and discuss with the students all or some of the following information:
      • Nicotine is found naturally in the tobacco leaf. It is the chemical that makes tobacco products so addictive. Nicotine can also be found in electronic cigarettes (vapes). In Ontario, nicotine is a legal drug but you must be 19 years of age or older to purchase tobacco products or e-cigarettes
      • When smoked, nicotine is absorbed through the lungs and into the bloodstream and to other organs in the body. It can take as little as 10 seconds for nicotine to reach the brain after it is inhaled.
      • Initially, nicotine may cause you to feel good to energized, or alert and calm. Nicotine causes blood vessels to constrict (narrow) which increases blood pressure. It also increases heart rate, decreases body temperature, alters brain waves, relaxes muscles and can affect the lungs.
      • Chronic exposure to nicotine affects brain development. This is particularly harmful during periods when the brain is developing, such as in young people (especially before the age of 25) or during fetal development (pregnancy). These lasting changes can negatively affect a person's thinking, reasoning and or behavior including memory and attention.
      • Nicotine is addictive. Young people may become more easily addicted because their brains are rapidly growing and developing. Nicotine can also train the adolescent brain for addiction to other drugs.
      • Not all vaping products contain nicotine, but for those that do, the level of nicotine can vary widely.
      • Some mixtures have very low levels, while others can contain more nicotine than a typical cigarette.

    Nicotine or Not Game

    • Preparation:
      • Teachers will print and cut out images from the Nicotine or Not Worksheet to provide to students
    • For this game, students will look at each image on the Nicotine or Not Worksheet and circle either True or False to determine if that item contains nicotine
    • Once each image has been identified as either containing nicotine or not containing nicotine, students will sort them into one of two categories (Contains nicotine or does not contain nicotine) using the Nicotine Sorting Worksheet

    Variations

    • Once items have been sorted into one of two categories, students can then turn to an elbow partner and explain why they sorted the images the way they did
    • This game can be played individually or in a small group with students working together to identify and sort the nicotine containing items

Resources

Consult Your School's Public Health Nurse

Your school's public health nurse can help you prepare for delivering this presentation and can assist you in developing engaging projects and extension activities. To reach your school's public health nurse, contact healthyschools@niagararegion.ca or 905-688-8248 ext. 7379.

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